In the dead we have our best and most important helpers

This is a powerful quote from Steiner. Now in my elder years, I find what he posits to be truth: that our best teachers and helpers are those we call “dead.” My upcoming book deals a great bit with that assertion. As a foundation, we’ll explore how we can serve the so-called dead. From there, the work will expand to the ways the so-called dead can help us….and how important it is for us to re-establish our sacred connection.

The great Rudolf Steiner Quotes Site

Our attitude towards those who passed through the threshold of death must be the same as towards those who still live here on earth. Indeed, we should not hesitate, to say: Those who still live in the physical body are handicapped in many ways, so that they cannot live a full spiritual life, they cannot live it to the full. How many handicaps can be observed in people during their physical life on earth, when it is a question of recognising the truly great tasks of evolution — and still more, when it is a question of FULFILLING THEM! We may rely far more on the dead. […] 

In the dead we have our best and most important helpers and you will not misunderstand me when I say: In our spiritual work we may rely far more upon the dead than upon the living.

But in order to be able…

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The love or even the sympathy we extend to the dead eases his path, removes hindrances from him

For me, it’s all about his last sentence. My upcoming book will explore that idea and others involving the dead and our relationship to them.

The great Rudolf Steiner Quotes Site

In order that we may really understand one another, I want to speak first of certain aspects of the mutual relationship between the living and the dead, starting with a quite simple phenomenon which will be explained in accordance with the findings of spiritual investigations. Souls who sometimes practise a little self-contemplation will be able to observe the following (and I believe that many have done so). Let us suppose that someone has hated another person in life, or perhaps it was, or is, merely a question of antipathy or dislike. When the person towards whom hatred or antipathy was directed dies, and the other hears of his death, he will feel that the same hatred or antipathy cannot be maintained. If the hatred persists beyond the grave, sensitive souls will feel a kind of shame that it should be so. This feeling — and it is present in many…

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