A Win and a Terrible Loss

2020 International Book Awards

It was my hope to have posted this last Sunday. However, I ran into major WordPress troubles so this is as soon as I was able.

I find it hard to write during this pandemic. My heart and mind so focused on what is happening in this country. More importantly, taking care of my family. Taking care of my husband and my three dogs, Bodhi, Leela and Nestor.

It hasn’t been conducive to talking with the dead as I am constantly filled with anxiety over what is transpiring. Hard for me to hear the angels through all the din. So, my writings might be sporadic for a while. However, I wanted to share two things with you.

First, my new book Could Anthony Newley Be My Muse? (Or His Story Never Ends) – Forging a Creative Bond with the Dead, was just named a finalist in the International Book Awards New Age Non-Fiction category. Considering that the winner was from a traditional publisher, I think this self-published book stood up pretty well. So, it was a bright spot on a rather dark horizon.

Nestor, July2 2020

More importantly is the death of one of my dogs, Nestor. I was managing about as well as one could during this time of unspeakable national and worldwide trauma until on Memorial Day weekend Nestor sat up on the bed, fell over and began having a Grand Mal seizure. It was only four years ago on Memorial Day weekend that we rescued Nestor. Now this.

I rushed him to the emergency room, handed him over to the vet tech and sat in my car (most vets are only offering curbside service) for the next four hours after signing permission to do CPR to revive him if necessary.

It should be interjected here that quite unexpectedly, Tony reached out to me, made his presence known, just before Nestor began to seize. I haven’t been in the quiet place necessary to communicate with him, but there he was. In hindsight, I think he wanted to give me a heads up, that something awful was going to happen and that he would be there for me, with my angelic team of teachers and guides. I felt them again as I waited, minutes turning into hours, waiting to hear from the vet what was happening with my Nestor.

We spent a good part of the weekend going back to that emergency hospital. In 40 hours, Nestor suffered 7 Grand Mal seizures and cluster after cluster of focal seizures. Reaching out to my alternative vet, I tried homeopathy at first but it became unmistakably clear that was not going to help what I was told was either a brain tumor or a brain lesion in a dog 12 ½ years old. Without an MRI, it was a best guess. The nearest facility that did MRIs for dogs is up in Richmond, VA which was at the time not only a hot spot for Covid-19 but also in the midst of the George Floyd protests. On top of the fact that Nestor would be required to be anesthetized for the procedure and any following radiation treatments or brain surgery. That would give him a few more months but at what cost to quality of life? My little boy had experienced enough trauma in his life, we weren’t going to put him through more. So, I called our veterinary hospice. They were wonderful.

We had six and a half weeks to get used (as if one could) to the idea what we were going to lose Nestor. The medications hospice put Nestor on assured that he would have no further seizures but the damage to his brain was severe.

Nestor was just beginning to learn to play. Just learning that it was safe here with us and no one would ever throw him away ever again. He was blossoming and I couldn’t wait to see how that would unfold next. It just wasn’t enough time with Nestor. Not nearly enough.

July 8, 2020, I held Nestor in my arms while the hospice vet helped him cross the rainbow bridge. My husband and I are devastated. My others dogs are grieving too – not wanting to eat. Its funny…no, it’s not…but I have been at the bedside of so many people during their journey into the afterlife…but to lose a furry family member brings me to my knees. I can handle the pandemic; I can handle all the challenges being thrown at us daily but I cannot handle the death of my Nestor…our Nestor. It’s too much.

So, it might be a while for me to be able to write more.

Stay safe. Try to stay sane. Until next time…

 

Five Star Review

5star-shiny-web

To be honest, I’m finding it quite difficult to focus on much beyond enduring this pandemic but I will not call it “the invisible enemy.” The Kabbalists would refer to it as a very strict teacher. Certainly this disease can teach us many lessons we’ve been slow to learn: we can’t keep pillaging the earth and its wildlife. We must learn that though we’ve created imaginary boundaries, we are truly all one. We will either survive together or die together. Those two come to mind first, but will we ever learn in time?

So, I struggle making a deep connection with my inner planes teachers and with Tony. I know they are there, I just can’t feel them even though they are sending me messages each day, guiding and protecting me.

I stay away from social media, only using the computer to buy the food and items we need. (Please, to whoever is doing it, stop hoarding. You are creating unnecessary shortages.)

Yesterday I checked my email and found a review from Readers’ Favorite. I also submitted my book for its contest. I’m enclosing it here. For me, it was a very bright spot in a rather dark time.

I still want to tell you about my experience at the Monroe Institute with medium Suzanne Giesemann. We managed that just before the country closed down. I will, I just need to find a good time. Oddly, I find myself having more work during the shelter-at-home period.

For now please read the review and keep your fingers crossed for the contests I submitted this book.

BOOK REVIEW

Reviewed by K.C. Finn for Readers’ Favorite

Could Anthony Newley Be My Muse? (Or His Story Never Ends) is an interesting work of self-exploration and New Age thinking penned by author Joellyn St. Pierre. Subtitled “Forging a Creative Bond with the Dead”, the work contains some mature themes, explicit language, and ideas that not all readers will be comfortable with. The author presents authentic experiences with after-death communication (ADC), despite having no previous mediumistic abilities, and proceeds to tell a memoir-style tale of her connection to the spirit of actor Anthony Newley and the results of this communication between the living and the dead. What results is an incredible and highly alternative view of life and spirituality which also provides guidance for other people on how to unlock this ability and allow the deceased to help them in their daily lives.

Author Joellyn St. Pierre has created a book that really has to be read to be believed, and whether you take it as fact or fiction, it is truly an inspiring work about the power of creativity and the very nature of spirituality itself. The narration is frank and honest, with the candid intimacy of a memoir-style work that allows us into a close personal connection with the writer, and with the incredible bond she explores between herself and Newley. The ADC element really lifts the veil on a spiritual concept which is new and intriguing to explore, and the technical elements of the book’s ‘how-to’ advice are well explained for those who are new to the idea. Overall, I would recommend Could Anthony Newley Be My Muse? (Or His Story Never Ends) to any reader seeking new information about the world beyond the veil.

In the dead we have our best and most important helpers

This is a powerful quote from Steiner. Now in my elder years, I find what he posits to be truth: that our best teachers and helpers are those we call “dead.” My upcoming book deals a great bit with that assertion. As a foundation, we’ll explore how we can serve the so-called dead. From there, the work will expand to the ways the so-called dead can help us….and how important it is for us to re-establish our sacred connection.

The great Rudolf Steiner Quotes Site

Our attitude towards those who passed through the threshold of death must be the same as towards those who still live here on earth. Indeed, we should not hesitate, to say: Those who still live in the physical body are handicapped in many ways, so that they cannot live a full spiritual life, they cannot live it to the full. How many handicaps can be observed in people during their physical life on earth, when it is a question of recognising the truly great tasks of evolution — and still more, when it is a question of FULFILLING THEM! We may rely far more on the dead. […] 

In the dead we have our best and most important helpers and you will not misunderstand me when I say: In our spiritual work we may rely far more upon the dead than upon the living.

But in order to be able…

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It is said that death is a riddle that no one ever has, or ever will solve

With my upcoming book, I hope to share a bit of that understanding.

The great Rudolf Steiner Quotes Site

Death is indeed life’s greatest riddle, so much so that the individual who could solve it would have solved also the other great riddle, that of life itself.

It is said that death is a riddle that no one ever has, or ever will solve. People who speak like that have no notion of the arrogance (German: Unbescheidenheit) the words imply, nor of the fact that a solution to the riddle does exist, but a solution they fail to understand.

Source: Rudolf Steiner – GA 55 – Supersensible Knowledge – Lecture VI: Illness and Death– Berlin, 13th December 1906

Translated by Rita Stebbing

Previously posted on May 23, 2016

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